Chinese holdings of U.S. debt are at their biggest in seven years Rick Docksai - 14 hours ago
Chinese bond-holders bought up a larger amount of U.S. Treasury debts last year than in the last seven years.
Banks still discriminate against black and Latino borrowers, study concludes Rick Docksai - Feb 19, 2018
They are approving white applicants' loans to move into the neighborhoods while disproportionately turning down nonwhite residents' loan requests.
Gallup survey reveals five happiest, healthiest states in the U.S. Susan Konig - Feb 19, 2018
The Gallup-Sharecare 2017 State of American Well-Being rankings were just released, revealing five of the happiest, healthiest states, and five which scored at the bottom of the list.
Senate kills four immigration bills in one day Rick Docksai - Feb 17, 2018
Four separate proposals on DACA came up for votes in the Senate Tuesday, and all fell short of the votes required to beat a filibuster.

Large majority of states defy Trump's 'fraud' commission requests
All states so far responding to the request say they cannot release Social Security numbers and many refuse to release any information that is not already publicly available.
By James Smith
Contributor
Feb 17, 2018

20 Amazing Quotes By President Obama

70 Absurd Things Trump Actually Said

The 20 Worst Political Scandals In History

WASHINGTON D.C. — As many as 44 states are refusing to comply with the Trump administration's request for detailed personal information about their voters.

Last week, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, vice chairman of the Presidential Advisory Commission Election Integrity, sent a letter to all 50 states asking for, among other things, voters' names, addresses, dates of birth, drivers license numbers, and last four digits of social security numbers, according to a report by Slate. The request also seeks information about the elections each person voted in since 2006.

All states so far responding to the request say they cannot release Social Security numbers and many refuse to release any information that is not already publicly available.

A number of major newspapers came out with Independence Day editorials sharply critical of what President Trump himself has called a "voter fraud panel."

"The White House says the commission's goals are lofty," wrote the Chicago SunTimes. "But all signs indicate it really is just looking for any scrap of information that might support Trump's unfounded claim that millions of people illegally cast ballots in 2016, which would further efforts to suppress the vote in future elections."

The editors at USA Today said Trump administration should focus on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election rather than baseless allegations of illegal voting.

"For the most part, President Trump has been in denial about Russian meddling, as if acknowledging the problem threatens the legitimacy of his election," wrote the editors, "and has focused instead on unproven allegations of extensive voter fraud."