North Korea launches another test missile

North Korea successfully tested another intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) late Friday night. The missile, which marks the Kim Jong Un regime's second test this month, flew about 621 miles, according to the Pentagon.
By Jeremy Morrow | Aug 03, 2017
North Korea successfully tested another intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) late Friday night. The missile, which marks the Kim Jong Un regime's second test this month, flew about 621 miles, according to the Pentagon.

The missile traveled for about 45 minutes and landed in North Korea's exclusive economic zone, according to Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, as reported by Bloomberg. It soared to an altitude of about 3,700 kilometers.

"It's getting close to New York," said Melissa Hanham, a researcher at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in California, in an email to Bloomberg, adding that the successful test showed North Korea is making progress toward having a missile capable of attacking such U.S. cities as Chicago or Denver.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in said in a statement that among the demonstrations of force he ordered in response to the North Korean dictator's actions is a joint U.S. ballistic missile test.

President Trump has said all options are on the table to deal with the North Korean regime, including military force.

Trump also has expressed frustration with China's unwillingness to control North Korea, which is its neighbor and ally. But the Chinese government is wary of triggering a collapse of Kim Jong Un's regime, fearing it could lead to a refugee crisis and increased U.S. military presence in the region, the Bloomberg report said.

"Pyongyang has once again made it clear that they are operating on their own timetable," said Ralph Costa, President of the Pacific Forum CSIS in Honolulu, in an email to Bloomberg. "My guess and when it comes to North Korea we're all guessing is that they are waiting for the next sanctions resolution, which they will then say 'forces' them to accelerate their program and we will finally have our much-anticipated next nuclear test."

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